TRANSFORMING A DIGITAL GAME
TO LIVE IN A PHYSICAL WORLD

 

ANALOG BLENDOKU 2

*disclaimer: I do not in any way claim to own Blendoku 2, and I would never attempt to sell my physical iterations of the digital game. This project was executed and put on display at my Sophomore and Junior Reviews to demonstrate my exploration of the crossovers between Game Design and Interaction Design.

 

Color plays an incredibly important function in design. Gamifying experiences can also make or break the success of a designed interaction. Color theory can be intimidating to the non-artist; however, gamifying color theory creates a fun, fulfilling, and educational experience for color enthusiasts, beginners, or even the colorblind. 

3 WEEKS, FALL 2015 | SOFTWARE: Adobe Illustrator | CRAFT: paper, chipboard, double-sided tape, adhesive magnets, magnet sheets, xacto blade, scissors
1 WEEK, SECOND REVISION FOR SOPHOMORE REVIEW EXHIBITION, SPRING 2016

PROCESS
0 Play many digital games. Read Tracy Fullerton's Game Design Workshop ch.3-5
1 Choose a digital game to transform into an analog version, staying as true as possible to its original game design elements.
2 Conduct user testing by watching people play.
3 [On my own time] Create 2nd and 3rd iterations, exploring how people's behavior changed.

 
 

DIGITAL TO ANALOG

 
 

the digital blendoku 2 has only hints,
no answers. But with a "pro" game this big
an answer key is necessary.

 
 

THE ANIMATIONS OF THE TILES ARE NOT
REPLICABLE ON A CHIPBOARD. HOWEVER,
A SIMILAR SENSATION SENSITIVE TO TILE SIZE,
WIDTH, AND WEIGHT WAS FOUND IN ADDING
LIGHT MAGNETS TO THE BOARD AND TILES.

 
 
 

when i left analog blendoku 2 on exhibit, every time i returned the puzzle was complete (which i then undid). To me that signified that my project was successful.

 

For the third iteration, I specifically wanted to make it bigger to explore the collaborative aspects of the game. When I first showed my family Blendoku 2 (digital, original version), they crowded around my phone and tried to work together to figure out the puzzle. I learned a few things while watching people interact with my final iteration.

  • People prefer to solve the most saturated values first (reds, oranges, blues) and would leave the muted, neutral colors on the side (yellows especially).
  • People liked to move around the colored tiles and leave them in the wrong place because (1) they don't have perfect color vision, and (2) trolls.
  • The size of the puzzle, while it did allow for more collaboration, could come off as more intimidating to solve (compared to iteration 2). 
  • When the puzzle is mostly solved, newcomers are less sure how to interact because the "hints" on the board are hidden.
  • Children like to stack them.
 

 

IF YOU WERE CURIOUS, HERE'S A BRIEF EXPLANATION OF THE ORIGINAL BLENDOKU 2

 
CLICK ON THE BANNER TO SEE THE ITUNES PAGE FOR BLENDOKU 2

CLICK ON THE BANNER TO SEE THE ITUNES PAGE FOR BLENDOKU 2

 

a DIGITAL, COLOR THEORY PUZZLE
GAME MADE BY Lonely few llc.
distinguish between hue, saturation,
and value to complete the tiled puzzles.

 
SIMPLE LEVEL 119

As the puzzles get more challenging, more hues and tiles are added. In my opinion, one of the most wonderful things about digital games is that storage is endless; in Blendoku 2 there are hundreds of puzzles and they all exist in a single device that we're already using as a "phone." Fun animations and micro-interactions keep the player engaged during play, and can also act as a reward at the conclusion of a puzzle.

An analog version lacks the original versatility of Blendoku 2. Recreating/substituting these digital elements in a physical version was a challenge, but I believe I was able to replicate the appeal of the digital game in a truly tangible way.

 

TO PROPERLY TRANSLATE BLENDOKU 2 FROM ITS DIGITAL FORM TO PHYSICAL FORM, SOME RESEARCH ON GAME ELEMENTS AND PLAY WAS IN ORDER